Know What to Say 

Here are a few key phrases that may come in handy in your social life, whether breaking the ice or mending fences. Learn them, practice them, use them! 

  • “I wanted to share with you a part of my life that I usually just share with my closest friends…”

  • “I know this sucks, but I can’t go out with you tonight because I need to take care of my health. I’m really glad you invited me, though, and hope it works out next time.”

  • “It’s disappointing and hurtful to me when you say things that seem to imply you don’t understand how important my health is to me.”

  • “I know I used to go out partying with you guys. But I’m changing, and growing, and it’s just not something I feel like doing much anymore. I’m trying to focus more on my health.”

  • “I wonder if you are upset with me because I have to cancel our plans often. Or, am I just putting thoughts into your head?”

Resources for Social Disclosure 

To tell or not to tell — that is the question. One helpful resource is a workbook published by www.disability.gov called, The 411 on Disability Disclosure: A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities. The workbook is designed to help people make informed decisions about whether or not to disclose their disability and understand how the decision may impact their education, employment, and social lives. The workbook treats disclosure as a very personal decision, and helps people think about and practice disclosing their disability.

To learn more, read an article published by the American Bar Association called, To Disclose or Not Disclose: Lawyers with Disabilities Speak Out.

back to top 

Updated 8/27/13